TPO – The Importance of Shaking Packages When Using a Dissolved Oxygen Monitor

When a dissolved oxygen monitor is your only option for measuring package oxygen content, the best way to calculate the total package oxygen (TPO) is from a shaken  (equilibrated) container. In my last blog post I wrote about what you can learn by measuring unshaken packages. This time we’ll focus on equilibrated packages, which are containers that have had sufficient shaking to bring the gases in the headspace and liquid to equilibrium. First, let’s define equilibrium.

The gases in the headspace and liquid of a package are in equilibrium when their partial pressure (also called percent concentration) is the same. The only way to create equilibrium after filling is to shake the package, so that the gases move from the area of higher concentration to the area of lower concentration and are finally distributed equally.

Packages can be shaken by hand, but if you’ll be shaking a lot of packages then you’ll probably want to use a rotary platform package shaker.

Packages must be shaken for different lengths of time, depending upon their temperature. This is because warm packages reach equilibrium faster than cold packages. As a general rule, warm containers need about three minutes of vigorous shaking and cold packages need about five minutes. When shaking cold packages, it is important to keep shaking the container up to the point of use and not let the package warm after the shaking is completed. If the package warms between the time it was shaken and the time it’s measured, then the oxygen partitioning in the package will have changed and you may underestimate the TPO.

What does a shaken package tell you? Since packages come off fillers with different amounts of gas in the liquid and headspace, the most practical way to calculate the total gas content is to equilibrate them and then make your dissolved oxygen measurements. If you measure the dO2 of a freshly filled package without shaking, then you’re only determining the oxygen content of the liquid, without any feedback as to whether there was sufficient fobbing of the headspace.

Knowing the TPO not only helps you determine exactly how much oxygen is trapped in the container and can react with the beer, but it also allows you to calculate the headspace contribution to the package oxygen concentration. The headspace oxygen of a package is the TPO minus the dissolved O2:

Headspace O2 = TPO – unshaken dO2

My final thought is that if you want to measure the TPO of your packages using a dissolved oxygen sensor, you must shake the packages and measure the dissolved oxygen in as short a time frame as possible. Since different beer types have different residual package O2 consumption rates, understanding your specific beer will also help you know just how quickly this needs to be completed. We’ll talk about that in a future post.

For a review of a previous post on what you need to know to measure total package oxygen, follow this link.

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